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A short list of creations and accomplishments listed for the curious

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"One passion to another, one good idea to the next - that's pretty much how he's always been." - grandson, Ryan Delano
 
  view Platt's auto-biography | view accompanying forward  
 
"GIT"-ROT - 1964
The beginning of Platt and Betty's gainful self-employment. This is an epoxy-based product used to stabilize and repair dry rotted wood. You may very easily have seen this product in a marina, it's still in production today. Shown here is the original product and packaging.
The original Git-Rot packaging
 
Wire Plank - 1969
This invention was one of Platt's more serious early endeavors. Wire Plank was used to make medium weight steel frames around which Fer-A-Lite was applied to form very strong yet lightweight hulls. Only recently did Platt decide to sell the intricate automatic welding device that produced the long rolls of Wire Plank.
photo of Wire Plank machine
 
Fer-A-Lite - 1972
A trowelable fiberglass mix forming a lightweight rock hard substance that Platt used to build boat hulls and many other things.
A dinghy made with Fer-A-Lite
 
Str-r-etch Mesh - 1975
This was a light, moldable steel wire weave used to build boat hulls and other structures. The steel frame would be surrounded by Fer-A-Light or a similar compound to form extremely strong surfaces.
Hull section made of Str-r-etch Mesh
 
Styro-Flyers - 1981
This hobby became much more serious when it was published as a full color punch-out book of toy airplane designs. These designs transformed the Styrofoam containers from fast food restaurants into amazing model airplanes.
Styro-Flyers cover
 
Geodesic Lightweight Airplane - 1981
This is where the Geodesic Boats concept was born. Platt built a fullsized airplane fuselage using the techniques and materials highlighted on this site. The fusellage is in a museum somewhere, though it never was given wings or flown.
Gee-O-Bee Geodesic airplane fuselage
 
"Dippa" boats - 1982
These boats included the Puddle Dippa, Double Dippa and most interesting, the Folda Dippa. The Folda Dippa was a fiberglass canoe that could be disasembled into two nested pieces that would then be strapped on ones back!
Platt with a fiberglass Folda Dippa on his back
 
Geodesic Airolite Boats - 1982
By now you surely know what these are - ultra-lightweight boats of all kinds.
A Classic 12 Geodesic AiroLITE Boat
 
Light weight boat building Strong Back- 1982
Just a clever way to build a very strong support on which to build a boat. It consists of two thin boards and two cardboard sides glued/stapled together. It's light weight makes it very easy to flip the boat during construction. This picture is where Platt demonstrates how strong it really is.
Platt standing in the middle of his first strong back
 
The Motorcycle Fairing! - 1983
Never intended for anything but his own use, Platt built an egg-like removable cover for his motorcycle for use in light rain or cold weather. This unusual looking device drew the attention of local papers - and surely that of anyone who saw him drive by!
Platts' motorcycle fairing in action - in the winter!
 
Ultra-Hut - 1983
Originally Platt built an arched structure using a wooden framework covered by heavy plastic to store vehicles and as additional workspace. Then he realized that the process could be better facilitated using huge metal arch segments. Ultra-huts have been used as garages, huge boat shops and to house a very long fish hatchery!
an Ultra-Hut
 
Jiffy-Sail - 1988
Platt was intrigued by the tear-resistance and strength of Tyvek since it's inception. It comes as no surprise that he found a use for it as an inexpensive do-it-yourself sail.
Ron Jonhson's Blivit 13 with attached Jiffy-Sail
 
Styrofoam Steam Box - 1989
Not a new invention, just a clever and inexpensive way to thoroughly steam ribs for greatly eased boat building. This device is described in the boat plans for home construction and use.
 
Clamp-Its - 1990
A simple, inexpensive adjustable spring clamp used to hold ribs and stringers in place while assembling a wooden boat frame. The original set he built by hand on a wire bending jig using spring steel.
Clamp-It photo
 
Evolution - The next step? - 1997
This is a tiny book about Platt's theories and observations on human evolution. Though abstract, his theories suggest that less is more, and that smaller people are proportionally stronger and would require a small fraction of that which we do today. An interesting short read.
Evolution - The Next Step cover
 
Crystal Boat - 1998
Highly unrecommended due to the tremendous difficulty to assemble, this is a completely see-through version of his Geodesic Boat.
A fully see-through Crystal Boat - the Westport Dinghy to be exact
     
Copyright 2002-2008 Monfort Associates.
     

Aladdin Products, Inc. d/b/a
Monfort Associates
50 Haskell Road
Westport, Maine 04578

 

Phone: 207 882-5504
e-mail:
bettemonfort <at>
roadrunner.com

     
 
 
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